Skip to content (Press enter)

Resources: Concentration

Concentration

 

Definition: The comfort and ability to be able to focus one’s attention on a particular task.

Greater Description: This is more a measurement of how well a person can control his or her mind onto single subjects for extended periods.

What the Trait is NOT: This trait does not measure interest in doing detail work.

Soon after the SL Behavioral Aptitude was developed we found a strong correlation between a person’s degree of competence and how high this trait was. Today this trait is integrated into the Focus trait which is even more telling of competence. Although in profiling some positions that require a lot of intelligence, this trait will sometimes be more valuable than the Focus trait.

Closely related traits: The Ability to Focus Trait.

 

TRAIT RANGES:

Extreme Low: 0 to 4. This person’s mind goes from one thing to another very easily. This person is very easily distracted or dispersed mentally. This person may have competency problems. This is not an indicator of attitude problems.

Low Range: 5 to 39. This person’s mind goes from one thing to another very easily. This person is easily distracted or dispersed mentally. This person may have competency problems. Research on this trait shows the less competent people tend to have poor concentration.

Medium Range: 40 to 60. The person has good flexibility between focus and other priorities and would be acceptable to most positions.

High Range: 61 to 95. This person is able to focus on the task at hand without difficulty and not easily distracted. Research on this trait shows the more competent people tend to have good concentration.

Extreme High: 96 to 100. These people are almost too fixed on the task at hand and can’t be distracted. These people can get so riveted on one thing that they are unaware of their current environment, someone talking to them or other priorities.

Concern: Low Focus (Below 20 and Concentration Trait below 30).

 

INTERVIEW QUESTIONS:

Are you more comfortable alone in a cubicle or in a more open environment with others?  Why is that?  (Ask more questions about it.)

What type of things distract you from your work (don’t accept, “nothing”)?  Why is that?  (Ask more questions about it.)

What else distracts you from your work (don’t accept, “nothing”)?  Why is that?  (Ask more questions about it.)

What works best for you when prioritizing your work?

(Change your line of questioning before the candidate learns what you are concerned about.)

What is your philosophy on dealing with work priorities?

What works best for you in fighting off distractions to get work done?  What experience have you had with that?

What is your philosophy on dealing with distractions?

Give an example of when you took a systematic approach towards a task.  How did it work?

Were you ever distracted or pulled in another direction?