Ep. 4: Creating a Killer Talent Pool

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Ep. 4: Creating a Killer Talent Pool

In this episode, we discuss how to create a talent pool that allows you to both actively and passively source candidates for your positions. We start with creating a real clear job description, differentiating that from your desired candidate profile, and having a really super duper powerful job advertisement that attracts A players.

Transcript

Fletcher:

All right. Welcome to the higher talent podcast. Looking forward to talking to you today about creating that candidate pool in this extra hot talent market. So question ultimately is is do you use a sniper method or do you use a WMD. Right? Sometimes using a little bit of both is ultimately the best strategy depending on the role. Sometimes a sharp shooter method is going to be the one you’re going to have to use. On maybe lower lever roles more of that WMD method might be the best strategy. Either way you’re going to want to create the largest pool you can possibly come up with.

Fletcher:

And the last thing that any of us want to do is end up with only one person to have to make a decision about.

Stephanie:

Yeah. Choosing the … What is the saying? Choose the best of what you got or something?

Fletcher:

The best of the worst.

Stephanie:

That’s never good.

Fletcher:

And I feel like so many of our clients end up in that situation.

Stephanie:

Yeah. Definitely.

Fletcher:

They’re like, “Well, you know we ran out, we got 25 candidates and these 3 were the best of the candidates and we’re trying to make a decision between these three candidates.” Well that’s just ludicrous.

Stephanie:

Yeah, but it’s so common. It happens a lot, like the majority of the time I think.

Fletcher:

Yeah, I think so, too. I’d love to hear comments on that. So if anybody wants to chime in or have a deeper conversation about this, I’d love to chat about. But we find ourselves doing what we know how to do, subsequently creating a candidate pool that’s the best we think we can create, and then because we need to fill the job and we need a warm body in that seat, but we want the best warm body. Nobody’s ever going to tell you that they’re going to settle for a C player, right?

Stephanie:

But I think that’s the case a lot of the time is they need to get it fast. And we talked about that in our previous episodes. Making the time to do it right. Hiring smarter, and that’s really a big part of it.

Fletcher:

Yeah. And if you are really effective of creating a large talent pool it can actually go quite quickly. So you got to make that investment in doing things the right steps, doing the things. We talked about floor, creating a real clear job description, differentiating that from your candidate profile, in your job advertisement, and having a really super duper powerful job advertisement that tracks A players, and not just a couple, but as many as possible.

Stephanie:

Right.

Fletcher:

So once we’ve done all those things, then it’s time to figure out where am I going to find these people. How am I going to find these people? I am a big fan of really using and attacking the process of creating a pool from every possible angle that’s out there. I think if we just put ourselves on job board or if we only rely on referrals or we only source people from LinkedIn, that we’re limiting ourselves from seeing the entire opportunity that’s in front of us.

Fletcher:

We’re just not creating a big enough pool, ultimately, if we limit how we go about it.

Stephanie:

Sure. What about a small company who maybe thinks of hiring for one position? It’s maybe not a super high level position and our budget is kind of limited. Do you still recommend that they post their job everywhere for something like that?

Fletcher:

Well, and this’ll be a whole nother topic, but it’s starting to discuss the cost of a poor hire, right? The amount of time and effort it takes to train and get somebody up to speed, and then the day it takes, in my opinion for most jobs, about a year before that person becomes an expert at the job that they’re doing. It takes probably 3 months to even figure out where the drinking fountain is at. Another 3 to 6 months they’re starting to get comfortable in their seat and starting to add value. 6 to 12 months they’re probably adding more value, but they still haven’t become an expert at what they’re doing.

Fletcher:

So that’s a huge investment of opportunity cost. So we’ll talk about that in quite a bit of detail in one of our next episodes.

Fletcher:

So I think that the investment is important. It’s going to cost you some money. It’s going to take some time to really identify that ideal person. So how do we go about doing it? Really there’s 5 things, 5 different strategies that are going to produce a result for you.

Fletcher:

Number one, great for lower level roles. Lower level meaning from very entry level all the way up to entry level professional jobs. So advertising, traditional advertising approach. Talk about that. The number one, hands down, the best hiring technique in time tested will always be true is referrals. So your best people know other great people. So leveraging and tapping into that network is hands down the best strategy.

Fletcher:

So having great active tracking systems that help you leverage your team’s network as well as leverage the power of the job boards that are out there these days helps you manage your social media and your hire guns. To the other next technique there is you could take a very precise and exacting, sharp shooting technique where you’re going out, you’re identifying very, very specific people that has specific types of background that are in your industry or have certain types of experience related to your industry and building relationships with those people.

Fletcher:

It’s a difficult strategy, one that most traditional recruiters are going to use. If you have an in house recruiter, they should definitely be doing this strategy. It takes a lot of data mining. It takes a lot of leveraging LinkedIn as well resume databases. It takes an enormous amount of effort because you’re basically finding people you don’t have a relationship with that have the background that you’re looking for. You’re reaching out to them cold and it may take time to build a relationship with them. They may not respond right away or they may not respond favorably.

Fletcher:

So your strategy may not be so much to you go after these people and try to recruit them for today, you might need to be creating a relationship with them in the future. So again this is great for highly specialized workers, people, or high level roles, people who have very industry types of experiences. You really got to use that sharp shooting method, one that most traditional recruiters will use.

Fletcher:

So that’s definitely the good method. Challenging one, but it’s definitely one that you got to have in your bag of tricks. If you do at some level or another, in any sort of recruitment, aside from the time investment, it typically is pretty inexpensive strategy. Just like referrals. So referrals in theory don’t cost you anything. You might want to pay a finder’s fee for your employees. If you give them $500, it’s a hell of a lot cheaper than spending $1,200 or $1,500 job advertisements.

Stephanie:

And something else I read recently that referrals, making it a part of the culture. So it’s regularly incentivized or it’s known that if you refer somebody who gets hired, this is what you get for it. And it doesn’t always have to be an elaborate gift or money or something like that. If I have a friend, I want to get my friend a job because I think my company’s cool, I’m going to do it whether I’m incentivized for it or not, but that just helps add the likelihood of it happening.

Fletcher:

Yeah, it goes back to the advertising part. People want to work in places where they’re going to be attracted to an opportunity where there’s a great story. And if my friend is telling me directly one on one story about how much they like working somewhere at this place, then that’s the best testimonial you’ll ever get. That candidate’s going to be the most engaged candidate that you’re ever going to get. So it’s a form of advertising.

Fletcher:

And if you create a great job advertisement, now you can arm your employees with that document to help share your story even better, or those videos, or links to the Glassdoor pages. So all these things that you can use to start your process, you can arm your team members with.

Fletcher:

So we’re going to talk about advertising, sharp shooting, relationship or referrals, social media is definitely has place, especially the larger the organization, the more your social media reach. To get out there or depending on the type of company, especially if you’re very business consumer type environment where you have a large social media following. You can really take advantage of that. Think of a friend’s restaurant, they had thousands and thousands, tens of thousands followers. You could just focus on one post. “Hey, looking for servers.” You’re going to get tons and tons of interest because these are the people that like going to your restaurant to begin with.

Stephanie:

Already engaged with your service or your product. They’re a consumer.

Fletcher:

So talk a little bit more about that. And then ultimately hired guns. So recruiters. So depending on the role, maybe lower level roles you look at staffing companies, folks who do temporary employment arrangements. We’re not personally huge fans of those organizations, but they definitely have a place. Or you can look at more of a traditional recruiter who’s looking to make a direct placement. So we’ll talk about the advantages there.

Fletcher:

So I always say as a rule of thumb, and people think I’m crazy, but I tell people my goal in a 30 day recruiting campaign is to create a talent pool between 300 and 500 candidates.

Stephanie:

Yeah, they think you’re crazy because they’ve never seen it before. That’s such a high volume compared to their 25 that they get, probably.

Fletcher:

Yeah. And that’s good for most, any kind of entry level to mid level role, you should be able to achieve those kinds of numbers. There might be some variance depending on the market you’re in, but for the most part, most major metros throughout the country, minus a handful, you should be able to create something close to that. Or if it’s not that, you should be in the 150 to 250 type of range.

Stephanie:

you should definitely have more than 25 to chose from.

Fletcher:

Or 50. Minimum you probably want to get close to that 100 number. So the fact of the matter is 90% of all the applicants that you get are really probably not even qualified or are not going to be all that good. Can’t especially in this current talent market, people who are looking for work are either all stars looking for a greater opportunity or they’re the ones that are having a hard time keeping a job because of potential problems. Most likely the problem keeping a job is a behavioral issue. They don’t play well with others, probably.

Fletcher:

So starting with advertising. This is the most common technique most of us are going to use. We want to create the widest net possible. If you’re on a budget, then you got to have a great attraction system. Period. There’s no other way to take advantage of free job links that are out there in this day and age. Without a tool that does it all for you.

Stephanie:

That just continues to collect.

Fletcher:

Continues to collect and to do that job for you. Because at the end of the day you need to be on dozens and dozens of job boards, right? So job board aggregators are all the rage. So if you want to take advantage of those and you want to take advantage of the micro sites, the very highly specific ones, so that could be like university career pages or industry specific ones like CPA’s industry or wide industry, you got to be all over the place. You got to be able to, basically, in one click post your job and get it out to all these places as often and as frequently as you like. And that including social media.

Fletcher:

So you got to find yourself an excellent applicant attractive system. They’re super inexpensive these days. It’s one of the reasons why we launched our own rapid recruit applicant attract system because we had this conversation with our clients over and over again. Go out, find yourself a good one. We had a few we recommended. Now we only recommend our own, of course. No, there are many, many out there. Very supportive of folks. Go find one that does that for you. If there is anything you want an applicant attract system does, it does that.

Fletcher:

Google is coming up in the world of job boards, so is Facebook. Again, you can post for free on these sites. Google is always free in this sense. So you got to find them all. So when you’re creating a job advertisement that is going to go out on the job boards, that’s going to go on your career page, it’s going to go out into the social media sites like Facebook, Career Page, you got to make sure it’s pumped full of keywords, that being like keyword titles, variations of titles. If you have some fancy name for your position like purple squirrel hunter, which most of our recruiters have that title, nobody knows what it is, nobody else is looking for that job. So use some more traditional type of key words and titles, and use a couple of them, especially for jobs that have a rider. Sales people have all sorts of job titles. Development rep, sales executive, account executive. There’s three different titles right there. And technically each one of those has it’s own kind of meaning. But at the end of the day, those are the types of things people are looking for. They’re looking for a sales job, right?

Stephanie:

Or even keywords of things like programs that you use or specific type of experience.

Fletcher:

Yeah. Especially if you’re starting to get into those more specialized jobs. Use industry keywords, buzzwords. IOT is a big one these days, Java or CAD. Make sure that you’re pumping those job ads full of those keywords so that if I’m looking for a job to use my CAD drafting skills that I could find you.

Fletcher:

So you take your really compelling message, your job advertisement, you make sure it’s optimized, search engine optimized, and then you got to get it out to all the job boards. So whether you’re using an applicant attract system or you’re not, really the two ones that you got to be on this day and age is Indeed and Zip Recruiter. I laugh myself. Zip Recruiter we fired maybe three years ago. And then we listened to Spotify-

Stephanie:

And every other commercial is Zip Recruiter, Zip Recruiter, Zip Recruiter.

Fletcher:

So we decided to give them another chance, and sure enough their marketing campaign has worked out quite well, and they’re really right up there. If not greater than Indeed’s ability to market jobs. They definitely do great job of making it easy for candidates to apply. Super, super easy. So if some people get frustrated with that, I only get a bunch of crappy candidates that don’t fit my requirements. But that’s not the point if you just get one that is an all star, that’s what matters.

Stephanie:

And a lot of them allow you to ask your own questions if you want to add a few more screening questions just put them on through.

Fletcher:

Yeah, you can. I’m not a big fan of that, but I know a lot-

Stephanie:

Barrier to applying.

Fletcher:

Yeah. I want to make it as easy as possible for people to apply because people are going to apply anyway. So if you have a candidate pool of 50 people, all of them are not that good, versus a candidate pool of 200 people and there’s a lot of them that aren’t that good. The chances of getting a few more good ones are better if you have 200 versus if you have only 50. Just pure math averages.

Fletcher:

So you definitely want to be on those two. Career Builder, Monster, they’re okay. Not a bad place to market. LinkedIn, it’s okay. Little better for the higher level jobs, even mid level jobs. I don’t even really bother with unless maybe it’s super specialized. Even then probably come disenfranchised with their ability to produce good results. They’re very expensive, but they’re better for that sharp shooting technique.

Fletcher:

So also just making sure you’re in places, like you have a career page and that you’re on Facebook and you’re on Google. Those are the best ways to advertise your jobs in this day and age. I typically set aside a budget between $1,000 and $1,500 for advertising. It seems like a crazy amount. If you’re doing recruiting all the time, you definitely want to it to be less. Lower that by leveraging your buying power with the job boards. But most people, fact of the matter is that’s what it’s going to cost you.

Fletcher:

But again if you’re leveraging a good applicant attract system, you’re leveraging all the free job boards, those in themselves we’ve seen that recently produce 100 to 200 candidates for really no cost.

Stephanie:

Same with on Facebook, you mentioned you could post an ad and pay for it. You can also just put it up on your company page, and it can go viral just by being shared. So that’s a free resource there.

Fletcher:

So leveraging the social media side is when you post the ad, make it a point to go to everyone on your team and ask them to share it. I don’t know, I have 400 friends on Facebook or something like that. I don’t know what the average person is this day and age. It’s probably in the few hundred.

Stephanie:

At least.

Fletcher:

In the realm. So if you have 10 people on your team, they all have 300, what is that? 3,000 people that that advertisement is going to get out to. That’s a pretty big number. And if that gets you 10 candidates, that’s pretty good. So take advantage of that for sure.

Fletcher:

So the next thing you can do, we talked about really, is the referral strategy. We talked a little bit about that. That is by far, hands down, all the surveys, all statistics, all the research still supports that referrals from existing top performing employees is the best way.

Stephanie:

Hands down.

Fletcher:

Hands down. So create a culture of referring talent. So you talked about the incentives don’t have to be crazy, monetary. What kind of incentives?

Stephanie:

I mean, you could even do a contest or something. If you have a position open up, you want to get somebody fast, make it a game for everybody. The incentive is to win. The competitive nature comes out in everybody. Maybe the prize is that you throw out a gift certificate to somewhere, restaurant or something. Maybe it is a gift card for Amazon.

Fletcher:

For lunch.

Stephanie:

Yeah, or whatever. Anything. Even making it a game makes it fun. People want to participate and contribute and be the winner.

Fletcher:

The key is just to be consistent. Have an internal marketing message within your organization to promote the promotion of your business.

Stephanie:

Pretty regularly. It’s always known that it’s the way it is. It’s what we do.

Fletcher:

Yeah. So the next time when your employee is out socializing with their friends and they mention that they have a friend or they’re interested in a new opportunity, then it will be on the top of their mind. So the best great people know other great people. That’s the bottom line. Just makes for greater, a much better working environment all around.

Fletcher:

So sharp shooting is kind of the next way to do it. It can be a challenge. The simplest way to do it is to have a great network on LinkedIn. If you’re in a highly specialized industry, you need highly specialized talent. You got to take advantage of that. It’s an easy thing to do. Spend 10 minutes or 15 minutes a week on LinkedIn connecting with people who are in your industry who have titles or roles that are your competitor’s businesses. Connect with these people on LinkedIn. And do it sort of religiously.

Fletcher:

I like to do it when I’m at the car wash.

Stephanie:

Waiting in line or something.

Fletcher:

Standing in line at the grocery store. [inaudible 00:23:35] I just start connecting with people on LinkedIn. One of our recruiters within three months-

Stephanie:

They had like a ton.

Fletcher:

Yeah. He connected with over 10,000 lighting professionals in like 3 months. Now he was more neurotic about it, but he was consistent. But you be surprised because it also builds momentum as you start to build a bigger, bigger network of people that are related to your business or your industry, types of people you’re looking for, they come to seek you out.

Stephanie:

Yes, absolutely. They see their friends or somebody from another company has joined and connected with you, and they wonder what they’re missing out on, so they’re going to connect, too.

Fletcher:

Yeah. So you and a couple people in your organization are doing this and you also now have a new opening, these people have hopefully been seeing your post on LinkedIn, they’ve been seeing your messages, they see you around so you’re somewhat of a familiar presence to them, and then all of a sudden you post a job, you might get a couple good hits. That’s kind of an easy way to do it. So that helps maximize your advertising effort. But it also allows you now to go and search through these people for free and reach out to them and bulk or specifically one on one because you’re already connected, you can go on and send them a nice message explaining that you’re interested in having a chat with them.

Fletcher:

Now I recommend whenever possible to have the C level executives do this. Hiring managers do this. So thing about this. If you’re a candidate, say you’re a software engineer, senior software engineer, and you’re working for some other company, and a recruiter reaches out to you who … Traditionally recruiters have a bad rap, and rightfully so, that they maybe don’t have a very good understanding of the industry or industry knowhow, right? So the recruiter reaches out to the senior software developer, and they don’t really speak that person’s language. It’s already kind of an automatic turnoff.

Stephanie:

Plus you’re not special. Recruiters reach out to everyone.

Fletcher:

Yeah, exactly. That’s their job is to do that. In these industries where talent is super thin, people are getting hit up by recruiters all the time. So they’re just getting hit by another recruiter. Now the CEO of a company taps somebody on the shoulder specifically and says “Hey, I’m very interested.” And has a genuine message and is authentic about how they reach out, the likelihood of getting a response and engaging the conversation is very high.

Stephanie:

Yes, because it’s also a really rare thing, I think, too.

Fletcher:

Yeah.

Stephanie:

You’re hand picked from the owner of the company.

Fletcher:

Yeah. Or just the head of a department. If you’re a smaller company and you don’t have a lot of C level executives, you have directors or management level people who are leading these teams, then those people should be the ones taking this approach. It also may require building relationship with these people. So you may reach out as a CEO to a special kind of talent, or you might reach out as a director of engineering to this talent and start a conversation, they just frankly might be flattered, they might appreciate that, but they just might not be good timing for them. But don’t bypass that. Take the time to have a phone conversation. Look, just love to chat with you, just get to know you better. Maybe there’s an opportunity in the future we can work together. Have a short phone conversation that’s very genuine. It’s real. Talk to them about things that are personal to them. Get to know the person. Share something that’s personal about yourself. That’s the best way to get somebody to open up to you about them is to open up about yourself there.

Fletcher:

Make it pretty casual in that conversation. And again, if you have a CRM, a good organizational system, you got to keep in touch with these people.

Stephanie:

And also ask them for a referral.

Fletcher:

There you go. Good point.

Stephanie:

Now that you’ve started a relationship, they are a step above not knowing them before when you reached out. Now you feel at least you’re on the same ground where you can maybe ask them if they know somebody if they’re not interested.

Fletcher:

Yeah. Or if there’s circumstances-

Stephanie:

You do that all the time.

Fletcher:

Yeah.

Stephanie:

[inaudible 00:28:22]

Fletcher:

Yeah. So again the A players know other A players, right? So if you can’t get this one A player, they might know another. They for sure know another one, I’ll tell you that. The question is whether they’re willing to share that information, really. So building a rapport. This strategy often takes time. You’ve got to be very forward thinking about it, be very organized. Again, having an applicant tracking system, system of reminders of your team that allows you to continuously stay in touch with these folks. Share messages with them. Share messages about your organization, just like we talked about the advertising, having a great advertisement. Again, you need your collateral when you start a conversation with someone. It’s very common for them to say “Send me some information about this opportunity.”

Fletcher:

And if you can send them a video about the other software engineers in your company and how happy they are and how fulfilled they are in their roles, that’s a pretty strong.

Stephanie:

Yeah, pretty good advertisement.

Fletcher:

Yeah, exactly. So that’s key. Also if you have a larger workforce, sales people are great recruiters. They’re going to know lots of people in the industry, so they can be great people to do this job as well. So it goes back to that referral side of things. Make sure if you have a decent sales force that those folks are out there making this stuff happen.

Fletcher:

So social media, that’s really the next frontier. It’s related to the referral side of it. Let’s leverage your existing team’s social media presence. It’s going to your team and making sure they’re regularly sharing this content with folks. Make that fun, make a little contest. Whoever consistently shares the job post the most gets a new fancy mouse, gadget for their desk that they always wanted. I don’t know. Anything. Super, super important.

Fletcher:

Social media automation tools that you can put in place that get your team members to opt into. That’s really powerful as well.

Fletcher:

So let’s see, the last one. Hired guns. So I always present a team bowl. I always feel like I’m a reluctant recruiter. Our recruiting business started because we’re a pre hire testing company. We provide those assessment tools to help screen and predict on the job success. What we found and the reason why we created this podcast is we found that those tools are great. They don’t solve all your problems. They tend to be much more powerful if they’re included in a robust recruiting and hiring strategy.

Fletcher:

And so many of us just don’t execute the strategy very well. We miss key parts of that strategy. So we began these best practices with people about 5 years ago. And we began creating massive amounts of content. Hundreds and hundreds of blog articles. Dozens and dozens of checklists and guides and eBooks. We got a book on the topic. We also got a second book on the way. And so we’ve been sharing these best practices with people for a long time. So they’ve used our assessments, they’ve come to us, they say I’ve been having this problem. Ultimately it wasn’t related to the assessment, it was related to some other issue within their recruiting process. They wanted to be enough talent, they weren’t finding folks, didn’t have consistent interview process, they didn’t check references, they didn’t know how to set compensation for people correctly. Whatever it was, onboarding issues.

Fletcher:

We would provide some advice on that. It was consultation. And some of these folks said, “Look, this is all great. I don’t have the time, the wherewithal, I’d rather just outsource this to an expert.” And took our first recruiting job. And that was in the light industry. Then it happened again, and it happened again, and then some of these people started coming back.

Stephanie:

It just kept happening.

Fletcher:

Yeah, it kept happening. And at one point, to be honest, we tried to get out of the recruiting business. But the phone kept ringing. And we’re happy to help. We really enjoy it. For me it was part of my lifelong mission. It gave us firsthand experience with what our clients were experiencing, which gives us the opportunity to have this podcast where we speak from experience. In the last 5 years I’ve interviewed close to over 5, excuse me, 8,000 people. Stephanie’s probably around a couple thousand.

Fletcher:

So as a whole we have spent a ton of time doing what we teach our clients to do, day in and day out. We understand how difficult it is. We practice these techniques ourselves that we show you. So hiring a recruiter can be good. If the time and energy, you don’t have the time and energy to invest in this process, and getting the right hire is critical to you, paying that fee is well worth it. It takes somewhere between 60 and 90 days to get a butt in the seat anyways. So if you have an open position that you would normally be paying that employee for, instead of paying the employee you pay a recruiter for that timeframe. It’s the same part of your budget. You’re spending that money on a recruiter for a few months to get the right person, it would be the same as having [inaudible 00:35:09].

Fletcher:

If you don’t have the time and energy to do it yourself to get it done correctly, making a mistake is extraordinarily costly for most position, if not all of them.

Stephanie:

More costly than hiring a recruiter, and then you still have to go back and do it all over again and find the right person.

Fletcher:

Yeah, the headaches and frustration and emotional pain that it causes both you and the person. The person you hired, by the way. You’re not just affecting yourself by making a poor hiring decision, you’re hurting somebody else and somebody else’s family and their livelihood, too. So it has a much further reach to get them all of detrimental emotions and dealings with problems that just your own personal pain.

Fletcher:

So hiring people who are specialists in the roles or the industry that you’re in is always good. Check their references.

Stephanie:

Always check everybody’s references.

Fletcher:

Yeah. If you’re going to buy something on Amazon, you’re going to read the reviews and check the references. If they’re not good, then you’re not going to buy that item. So do your due diligence on hiring a recruiter, just like you would when you’re hiring somebody to come work for you.

Fletcher:

Seek out those specialists. If you’re going to look at a staffing company, somebody who provides folks on a temporary or permanent basis, be careful. Be wary of those situations. They’re really, truly looking for a full-time long term person, then I don’t typically recommend that strategy. If I just need a temporary person, I’ve got somebody on maternity leave or I just have a temporary project that needs to be filled or I need to boost up my workforce for a short period of time, then that could definitely be a good path. I still wouldn’t deviate with my interviewing assessment process very much. If when working with those folks, in other words they bring you talent that looks interesting. Go through the same interview, the same assessment testing, reference checking process that you would if you’re hiring that person on full-time.

Stephanie:

Because you might eventually. It might turn into it.

Fletcher:

Maybe, yeah. But if your goal is to bring on a full-time employee, I would go for a direct placement professional executive search partner as opposed to a staffing partner. The bottom line is there’s more jobs available than there are employees to fill them. People, good people, have opportunities to get full-time employment that offers security and a step up opportunity for that individual. So those people that hire caliber talent are not going to engage in temporary assignment world. If you had a choice between a temporary assignment and a full-time job with benefits, which one are you going to take. It’s a no brainer.

Fletcher:

So unfortunately staffing companies aren’t going, just by the nature, are going to have a hard time attracting A talent. So those are really the 5 main strategies, your traditional job board to give you some suggestions on where to go and how to market those. Sharp shooting, going out and building those relationships yourselves using a variety of different tools out there. Referrals from existing employees, your A players referring other A players. Social media, leveraging the power of that and ultimately hiring a hired gun to go out and do the work for you. There’s definitely some advantages to that at times.

Fletcher:

One way or the other, you got to create a massive pool of the best qualified talent as you can, and that should be several hundred people ideally. Or highly specialized roles it should be dozens and dozens and dozens for those positions. So yeah, anybody interested in chatting with us or hashing out one of their recruiting problems, we’d love to have you on, have a discussion. Anybody who has an opinion about or a technique related to the topic of hiring, we’d love to have you on, hear your take on this message. We’re definitely open to new ideas. We’re always looking for the next best idea, right?

Stephanie:

Yep. Always.

Fletcher:

Definitely not close minded. As much as we know, we don’t know what we don’t know. So we love to hear from other experts. We can be reached at info@thehiretalent.com. Once again it’s info@thehiretalent.com or you can call us directly. 714-582-2730. Once again, 714-582-2730. We look forward to engaging with you guys in the next episode.

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