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Resources: Ability to Apply

Flat lay of business concept

Ability to Apply

 

Definition: The willingness and energy one has to do things and work rather than think about ideas.

Greater Description: How physically busy or how much time a person spends at work. This is the measurement of Lazy or Hard working or Work Ethic.

What the Trait is NOT: The skill in applying techniques or motivation.

Closely Related Traits: Motivation is the most closely related trait on the SL Behavioral Aptitude or IC Behavioral Aptitude.

 

TRAIT RANGES:

Extreme Low: 0 to 12. This person is likely to be a procrastinator on anything but thinking. Low scores like this are automatically included in lowering the Motivation trait. Therefore if the score for Ability to Apply is below 38, you should check to make sure this person is not one of those that is so theoretical as to be considered lazy for the position. If the score is below 13 then you should be doubly careful.

Low Range: 5 to 37. This person may have difficulty getting things done, applying what he or she has been taught. This person may do well on purely thinking type jobs such as a chip designer. Clients have mentioned that their employees who scored in this area sometimes turned out to be lazy. Therefore if the score for Ability to Apply is below 38, you should check to make sure this person is not one of those that is so theoretical as to be considered lazy for the position.

Medium Range: 38 to 65. This person has a good balance between thinking and producing. In fact, the range between 38 and 55 is the ideal range for the ability to apply.

High Range: 66 to 95. This person is likely to be good at doing or being busy. He or she may have a tendency to throw time and effort at problems rather than effectively dealing with them. He or she may do well in jobs that require a lot of effort without a lot of thought.

Extreme High: 96 to 100. This person is likely to be good at doing and being busy. He or she may have a tendency to throw time and effort at problems rather than effectively deal with them. Check the Analytical Competency and Logic traits to see if this person is capable of efficiently solving problems. He or she may do well in jobs that require a lot of effort without a lot of thought. This person is likely to be a “workaholic.” High scores like this make up only a tiny part of the overall competency prediction.

 

INTERVIEW QUESTIONS:

What do you think of work environments that are disorganized enough to cause 10-12 hour workdays, six days a week to stay on customer schedules? (Don’t say your company is not like this. If you do, you are feeding them information to answer your questions the way you wish. Tell them after the interview is over.)

How many days a month would you be willing to work 10 to 12 hours a day even with overtime pay? (If they say, “It depends.” Then ask, “What does it depend on?”)  What is your reasoning behind that?  (Ask questions about their answer.)

Do you prefer the more theoretical side of a job or the doing side of a job?  Why is that your preference?  How would you describe yourself based on this preference?  (Question the applicant’s answer.)

Do you have to be reminded to take your vacation time?  Why is that?  Ask about the person’s answers.

Do you feel hard work is the answer to most problems at work?  Why is that?  What experience have you had with that?  (Question their answers.)

Tell about a time when you had too much to do at work and it was causing you to feel stressed.  What did you do?  How did you handle the stress?

When do you look forward to going to work?  What are the main reasons you come to work?  How would you rate the importance of each of those?  (Ask questions about their answers. Money motivation indicates low motivation. )

What was your purpose in working at your last job?  Why was that?  (Question their answers.)

Do you have any workaholic tendencies?  Tell us more about that.  (Question their answers.)

Tell us about a particular time when had to complete a difficult task.

When have you had seen someone drag their feet when facing a project or task?  Why do you think they did that?

How do you handle stressful situations?  Give an example.

Think of a time when you went above and beyond for a coworker or a customer.

Sometimes success is more than luck. When have you had to put in sweat equity to get something done?  Why was that the only way?  How many hours did you put into that?  What was the result?

Tip: Don’t telegraph the profile or the answers you would like to hear. Instead, ask questions where the correct answer is difficult to determine. For example, don’t ask, “What would you do if you had to work a 12 hour day to get a project out?” (The obvious answer you’re looking for is that you would work 12 hours a day until the project is complete whereas the suggested first question above gives no clue of what you looking for.)